Health Risks of Being a Construction Worker

Despite advancements made to lower the quantity and incidence of diseases in the construction sector, more working days are lost each year due to illnesses than to injuries.

Simon Jukes, deputy chief occupational advisor at MOHS Workplace Health, examines the health concerns related to the construction industry in part one of this two-part article.

Despite advancements made to lower the quantity and incidence of diseases in the construction sector, more working days are lost each year due to illnesses than to injuries.

Workers have a significant chance of contracting diseases from a variety of health conditions, as per the stistics from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE):

Cancer: Of all the industrial sectors, construction has the highest rate of occupational cancer, with more than 40% of cancer-related deaths and registrations mostly because of the materials especially cements https://lamexicanaconcreto.com/.

Hazardous waste: Some activities release dust, fumes, vapours, chemicals, or gases into the atmosphere, which can be a major factor in breathing difficulties and lung conditions. Due to exposure to dangerous compounds, dermatitis affects construction workers at significant rates as well.

Physical health risks: According to estimates, skilled construction trades have one of the highest rates of back problems, upper limb diseases, and illness brought on by noise and vibration.

the root causes

Maintenance workers are at a significant risk of developing occupational diseases for a variety of reasons. These consist of:

Construction sites: Work is done in a variety of settings, all of which carry potential health dangers, including those already present like asbestos. dynamic nature of the work; environments are frequently evolving, and many trades may be engaged in activities that could be hazardous to both their own and others’ health.

Low understanding of health dangers and required controls for risk appreciation: Serious conditions can take many years to manifest, and the immediate impact of a hazardous job exposure is sometimes underestimated in favor of the injuries brought on by accidents.

Employment: Several workers have little to no interaction with vocational health professionals because they are either self-employed, work for small businesses, switch jobs frequently, or are utilised away from home.